Post 15 May 2014, 21:43

[1992] "Edition 01" Rulebook

Neokmc (NinjaJim) wrote:So much historical information in these.. Its great to see how some of the simple things we take for granted started out.
Not to mention rules and ideas like associations as early as 1995 :O

Earlier than that ... the first official rules (called "Edition 01") were written in March 1992. Many people are unaware that today's Nationals rules were originally based on the second edition ("Edition 02") of the rules written in April 1994. The rules from that Edition were modified accordingly to suit the requirements of the tournament and the site.

Here's a cut-and-paste of the first edition rules:

... and a link to Edition 02 COMPETITION RULES AND INFORMATION (1994): http://mylasertagforums.com/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=68


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ZONE 3 LASER GAMES

COMPETITION RULES
AND INFORMATION

Compiled and written by
B Barns and I Northey

March 1992 - Edition 01
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RULES

The following rules have been compiled after discussion and consultation with numerous Zone 3 players and staff. All have been fully game tested and used in various competitions.


1. REFEREES

The Referee's decision is final.

All competition games should have one or more Referees and all players must abide by the decisions and interpretation of the rules made by them. If there are any questions about a decision, players should lodge an appeal at the completion of the game (see the section on "APPEALS").


2. CONTACT

Players are not permitted to intentionally strike other players with their gun or body; however, unintentional contact such as that occuring during normal game play is unfortunately sometimes unavoidable.


3. FOLLOWING BEFORE GAME POWER-UP

Neither players nor teams are permitted to follow or chase an opponent or opposition team in the first seconds of the game, ie. before initial power-up. Note, however, that during game play, players are permitted to follow or chase players that are "dead".


4. COVERING SENSORS

Players are not permitted to cover pack sensors with any part of the body or with any other item, including clothing they are wearing. However, players are permitted to shield packs they are wearing, behind walls, partitions or any other fixtures within the playing area.

At Zone 3 sites where "base stations" are used, players are not permitted to intentionally shield "base station" sensors.


5. CROUCHING

Crouching includes squatting, kneeling, and leaning or bending at an angle of more than 45' in any direction while standing, moving, squatting or kneeling.

Crouching is not permitted in Zone 3 sites using equipment version 1 or 2 because, by so doing, it becomes difficult to "hit" the pack.

Crouching is permitted at Zone 3 sites using equipment version 3 and above because the equipment incorporates shoulder sensors to overcome the problem of a player leaning forward in an attempt to make it more difficult to "hit" the pack.

Sitting or lying down during game play is not permitted at any Zone 3 site.


6. NON STANDARD GUNS

Players are not permitted to use any enhanced, modified, or "home-made" gun or any form of "super-gun" unless permitted by the Referees.


7. FEATURES AND FIXTURES

Players must not climb on or through, or jump over any railings that may exist in the playing area; climb on or over any fixtures that may exist in the playing area; climb into the roof of the playing area; fire their gun over the top of any wall, partition or fixture that is not designed to be fired over; or move any features in the playing area.


8. HOLDING THE GUN

Firing or holding the gun with two hands is not permitted at Zone 3 sites using equipment version 1 or 2. The size and weight of the gun at these sites make it easy and safe to fire using one hand. Firing with one hand also prevents players firing with their elbows tucked inward which may cause a breach of the "COVERING SENSORS" rule (rule 4).

Firing or holding the gun with two hands is permitted at Zone 3 sites using equipment version 3 and above. Firing with one hand only is also permitted, but players must be stationary to do so. The larger, heavier gun at these sites is designed to be used with two hands so, for safety, players must hold the gun with two hands whilst moving through the playing area and move with their arms held so as to not cover the pack sensors.

Covering the pack sensors will cause a breach of the "COVERING SENSORS" rule (rule 4). If a player is using two hands Referees should use discretion as to whether the player is covering the pack sensors.

When moving through the playing area, players are not permitted to hold their gun outstretched dangerously ahead of their bodies; they should instead hold their gun close to their side.


9. RUNNING

Players are not permitted to run at high speed.

Referees should use discretion where high speed running is concerned, especially when players are chasing other players or are being chased.


10. FIRING AROUND CORNERS

For safety, players must look around corners before they point their gun around them to fire, even if they already know an opposition player is there.


11. "DEAD" PLAYERS

A "dead" player is not to be used as a shield or cover.

A player who is "dead" is not permitted to intentionally shield or cover another player.

Referees should show common sense when enforcing this rule, as it would be unfair, for example, to penalise players on a team storming an area and the lead players get "hit", unintentionally forming a shield for the team members following behind.


12. HANDLING EQUIPMENT

No player is permitted to handle the pack or gun of another player. The only exception to this rule would occur if the gun cables of two players became entangled.


13. ALLIANCES

Neither players nor teams are permitted to "gang up" on opposition players or teams, ie. players or teams are not permitted to "join forces" against rival players or teams and hence form an alliance and agree not to attack each other, but to attack only the remaining players or teams.


14. GAPS IN WALLS OR PARTITIONS

Players are permitted to fire at other players through holes and gaps in walls and partitions. However, for safety, players must neither poke their guns through those holes or gaps nor poke their guns through any railings that may exist in the playing area.


15. HOLDING UP AN AREA

Neither players nor teams are permitted to remain in an area for more than one minute. This rule includes two players of one team swapping positions whilst remaining in an area. Players must move a minimum distance (determined by the Referees, but usually 10 metres) from their playing position before the minute elapses. Players "pinned down" must attempt to escape and hence must move the minimum distance before the minute elapses.

It is particularly important that Referees use common sense at Zone 3 sites where "base stations" are used. This rule applies to the playing area away from "base stations" but does not apply in the immediate vicinity of a "base station"; in other words, a player or team attacking or defending a "base station" should not be considered to be holding up an area.


16. NEUTRAL PLAYERS

Any player talking to a Referee is considered neutral and should not be fired at.

Players talking to Referees should have a valid reason to do so. Remember, appeals against Referee's decisions are to be lodged at the completion of the game. "Hits" obtained whilst talking to a Referee will be deducted at the completion of the game.

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A player deemed by the Referees as infringing any of the above rules should be "terminated".

At Zone 3 sites using equipment version 1 or 2, the player's first termination results in 10 "hits" being added to the player's score. The player's second termination results in an additional 20 "hits" being added to the player's score and expulsion from the game.

At Zone 3 sites using equipment version 3 and above without the computer scoring download system, the consequences of being terminated are the same as for Zone 3 sites using equipment version 1 or 2. However, at Zone 3 sites using equipment version 3 and above with the computer scoring download system, the first termination results in the loss of 1000 points from the player's score. The second termination results in the loss of all points and expulsion from the game.

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REFEREES

o All competition games should have one or more Referees controlling game play. Referees interpret the rules as they see fit and cannot play in the game they are refereeing. Preferably, they should not participate in the playing of any games in the competition. By not participating, the Referees remain unbiased.

o It is desirable that the number of Referees controlling a given competition game be determined by the number of players in that game: one Referee to four players is preferable.

o Referees must have a comprehensive knowledge of the rules and preferably have played competition games.

o It is the responsibility of the Referees to ensure all players in a game know the rules before a competition game begins. Before the start of a game the Referees should also explain any variation to the rules they will be applying during the game.

o During a competition game the Referees have absolute control of that game and its players. Any player or players deemed by a Referee to have breached any of the rules should be "terminated" immediately by that Referee. The player should be told the reason for the termination, and play then allowed to continue. If it is the player's second termination, the player should exit the game immediately after being given the reason for the termination. If the exiting player is part of a team, the rest of the players in the team should continue the game until it concludes or until they too are "terminated" out of the game.

o During a competition game the Referees do have the authority to disqualify any player, players or team for such reason as they see fit.

o During a competition game the Referees should avoid interfering with play as much as possible.

o During a competition game the Referees should not inform players or teams of the whereabouts of other players or teams.

o At the completion of a competition game, it is the responsibility of the Referees to note the scores of each player or team and to hear any appeal against decisions made during the game. The section on "APPEALS" explains the procedures to be followed for an appeal. Points obtained by players "hit" whilst talking to Referees during game play (refer rule 16) will be deducted.

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APPEALS

o Appeals against decisions made by Referees during a competition game can only be lodged at the completion of that game.

o An appeal against a decision can only be lodged with the Referee that made the decision during the game. That Referee may then, if appropriate, consult other Referees and/or players before making a decision on the appeal.

o Players must not argue with the Referees but should present their case calmly and logically. Players must them abide by the decision made by the Referees on the appeal and the matter shall then be deemed closed. Remember, "The Referee's decision is final".

o Points will be re-allocated at the discretion of the Referees if an appeal is upheld.

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TEAMS

As the number of available players and their preferred type of competition can vary, the information following has been developed from experience gained in previous competitions in the hope it may aid in the development of further competitions and competition formats. The information provided is intended as a guide only.


o A competition team may consist of one, two, three or four players (known as singles, doubles, triples and quads respectively). Any more than four players is not recommended. In a competition game, opposing teams should have the same number of players.

o The size of the playing area will determine the ideal number of teams in any competition game.

o As teams often use "attack" and "defence" players, it is suggested that teams should not play "undermanned" as a reduction in team members can dramatically affect the scoring due to the lack of "targets" for opposition teams or players.

o If a team does not have a full complement of players, substitute players from other non-playing teams may be used. In this case the substitute players may require a scoring handicap (see the section on "SCORING"). The decision to allow substitute players or to apply a handicap or both is at the discretion of the Referees.

o If a team is allowed to play with one or more absent team members, then the score for the missing team member or members should be two times the average score for the playing members of the team.

o To be eligible for finals play, a team must have played at least a quarter of the total competition games. This will prevent "zone sharks" from appearing on finals nights and winning the competition.

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SCORING

SCORING - EQUIPMENT VERSION 1 OR 2

At Zone 3 sites using equipment version 1 or 2, individual scores are added together at the completion of the game to obtain a team score. The team with the lowest score wins the game.

In the event of a drawn game, the highest individual score from each team is excluded and the scores added again. Should a further draw occur, the next highest individual score is excluded and so on. If this process continues to the point of having no scores left to exclude, the teams can either have a re-match or share the points equally. This will be at the discretion of the Referees who may first consult with the players to ascertain their choice.


SCORING - EQUIPMENT VERSION 3 AND ABOVE - (WITHOUT COMPUTER DOWNLOAD SYSTEM)

At Zone 3 sites using equipment version 3 and above without the computer scoring download system, the equipment incorporates sensors on the player's shoulders and may also incorporate sensors in the gun, both of which give the capability of a "stun". A "stun" is a predetermined time in which the player cannot fire but may still be "hit".

Scoring with "stuns" is different from that when equipment version 1 or 2 is being used. When "stun" mode is operational, more importance is placed on a "hit" in the pack, known as a "dead hit", than on a "hit" in the shoulder or gun, known as a "stun hit". Therefore, at the completion of a competition game, the points allocated for "hits" obtained in "stun" mode are:

each "dead hit" -- 3 points, and
each "stun hit" -- 1 point.

When "stun" mode is not operational, "hits" in the shoulder, gun or pack are recorded as "dead hits". For this reason, all "hits" should be counted at face value of 1 point.

Individual scores are tallied at the completion of the game and then added to obtain a team score. The team with the lowest score wins the game.

In the event of a drawn game, Referees have the option of excluding individual highest scores (as for Zone 3 sites using equipment version 1 or 2); organising either a pre-programmed elimination game or a re-match; or allocating points equally.



SCORING - EQUIPMENT VERSION 3 AND ABOVE - (WITH COMPUTER DOWNLOAD SYSTEM)

At Zone 3 sites using equipment version 3 and above with the computer scoring download system, determining an individual score is as easy as looking at the scores printed by the computer at the completion of the game. Individual scores would have been added together by the computer which also prints the team score. The team with the highest score is the game winner.

In the event of a drawn game, Referees have the option of excluding individual highest scores (as for Zone 3 sites using equipment version 1 or 2); organising either an elimination game or a re-match; or allocating points equally.

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HANDICAPPING

Handicapping may be used by Referees to balance a competition. Handicaps may affect a player's score or a team's score, whichever the Referees deem appropriate. The method of handicapping will need to suit the version of equipment in use and hence the scoring method used, and should be decided before a competition game commences. The handicaps applied may be used for the entire competition or for one game only. They may also be adjusted, if necessary, as the competition progresses.

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LADDERS

If a competition has been designed to continue for a certain period of time (3 or more weeks for example) then it may be appropriate to use a competition ladder showing the progress of the various teams. To determine positions on the ladder, it is suggested teams receive points
as follows:

winning a competition game -- 4 points,
drawing a competition game -- 2 points, and
losing a competiton game ---- 1 point.

The award of 2 points for a draw will depend on whether or not the Referees decide to allow draws in the competition rather than their determining actual game winners using the methods suggested previously.

The number of games played, player and team handicaps as applicable and team percentages should be included on the ladder. Percentages should be used to rank two teams in the event they are equal on points at any stage of the competition. Before the percentages are calculated, individual scores excluded to determine a game winner in the event of a draw (if this method were used) should be re-included.

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GAME STRATEGIES

There are a number of varying strategies that may be used by individual players or teams whilst playing a competition game. These strategies will depend on the type of competition being played, the number of players in the team, the number of teams in the game, the equipment version being used, the layout of the playing area, and the features and fixtures within the playing area.

While it is not possible to turn every player into a winner overnight (only practice can do that) players may find it helpful to peruse the suggested general strategies which follow. They are taken from experience gained in previous competition and non-competition games played at various Zone 3 sites.


o Communicate with team-mates - perhaps use a "password" during game play.

o Work in pairs wherever possible.

o If working in pairs or trios, alternate the lead when moving within the playing area.

o Avoid taking up position near any mirror, reflective object or reflective paint.

o Listen. Opposition players may give away their location or that of rival teams.

o Assign "names" to various parts of the playing area. Refer to these "names" when communicating with team-mates.

o "Double-back" on "dead" opponents and try to catch them as they power-up.

o Try to predict the location of opponents.

o Use walls, partitions and other fixtures to shield packs and prevent excessive "hits".

o When "dead" and being chased, head toward other "live" players, as they may fire at the player that is chasing.

o Move randomly through the playing area and don't use patterns.

o Allocate "attack" and "defence" players at Zone 3 sites with "base stations".

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The information contained in this booklet is intended as a guide only. Competition organisers should feel free to adjust, discard or add any rule or point of information they consider appropriate. However, in doing so, they should consider player safety, and bear in mind that the rules in this booklet were conceived from that point of view.

The authors themselves are competition players and most of the information contained in this booklet is drawn from their knowledge and experience. The authors would like to thank Katie and Patrick Holmes, and Richard Merton, for their suggestions and time.

The rules and information contained in this booklet are correct at the date of print. Any changes necessitated by advancements in technology or software improvements will be covered in later editions.

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